close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Apprentice Hunting License

Discussion in 'Upland Game hunting, Dogs and dog training' started by jackc99, May 4, 2007.

  1. Many of the States have passed language that authorizes a youth "apprentice" license. Ohio has had great success. It's called the Families Afield program and can be found on-line. Kyle Hupfer really pushed for the youth turkey and deer weekends- and those are GREAT, However, he also really liked the free hunting weekend which I think has some problems. The apprentice license allows a mentor to take a kid out to see if they like to hunt, regardless of the season. Plus, the kid must buy a license, which counts towards our federal aid money. It can also be used in any season, so the kid can pursue a variety of game animals. The hunter ed folks might not like it because it excuses the kid from taking HE while under the apprentice license.

    The license could only be purchased once. After that they must attend the HE classes and get a regular Youth license. The goal is to introduce as many kids as possible to hunting without having too many obstacles in the way.

    Opinions please?

    HatchetJack
     

  2. I like it...as long as the mentor has a valid Indiana hunting license. One of my questions is: if the kid is hunting birds (i.e. turkeys/pheasants), does he/she have to purchase the game bird habitat stamp in addition to the "apprentice" license?
     
  3. One of my buddies in Ohio was telling me about their apprentice program. I think he said they can go as an apprentice for two years and then they must take Hunter's Ed. I actually think it is a great idea. Let's say the neighbor kid is expressing interest, but no parents that hunt or willing to take him to hunter ed, an apprentice program would let him try it out with another responsible mentor. I think the idea is great and would fit well into our Indiana system for recruiting new hunters.:coolgleam
     
  4. I think I'd rather see the kids take HE before they start hunting. I'd like to see that they have been proven proficient in firearm safety and proper general hunting practice. But I do like the idea of the kids having licensing options available that get them actual field time as early as possible. What is the age limit for this apprentice license in OH?? Sounds like a good plan to me.
     
  5. whats wrong with the youth license system. Cmon it is super cheap and allows the youth to hunt all game animals. If the HE is the concern then make it an age thing. By the age of 10 a hunter must have completed the hunter ed course. Bam problem solved.
     
  6. Sounds like a good idea to me. I think kids could easily get overwhelmed by all of the extra's in the beginning (Hunter's Ed, etc.)

    What DEC said is entirely true. Although they may not have their Hunter's Ed out of the way, the mentor would be in complete control of the situation. The neighbor scenario is the exact reason it would be great. Some kids may love it, when their parents have no interest.

    Just let 'em shoot a buck for crying out loud. There's no other way to get someone hooked faster...!!!
     
  7. The problem with that Jones, is that our H.E. program is pretty lame, IMO. No offense to the instructors. They do what they are told to do using the instruction materials. But the entire system is lame. It has a few good points and I really like the movies showing what can happen. Drives a shock factor into the kids heads. But in general, the system stinks.

    I sat through it myself 5 or 6 years ago so I could hunt out west. Then sat through it again last fall with my daughter. There are no hunting skills to be learned. Very little on how to safely handle a firearm. Very little on how to safely shoot.

    Now granted, not all "mentors" would make good mentors. But I can tell you that a kid will learn more with someone like myself in one weekend in the woods than they will learn in H.E. class.

    Now you could argue that a mentor could take a kid to the woods anyway to tag along while the mentor hunts and you are right. I've done it with my kids since they were very little. BUT many many adults look at a kid tagging along as someone getting in the way or ruining the hunt. There are not a lot of adults that drag a kid along in a non-hunting capacity, just to expose them. But I think more would be willing to do it, if the kid could actually have the opportunity to pull the trigger.

    They still would have to take H.E. at some point (hopefully a restructured class), but at least they would actually be able to get some real world experience to help them decide if hunting is for them.
     
  8. ccavacini

    ccavacini Super Mod Mod

    Jack, sounds like a good idea to me. Anything to encourage and make it easier for young people to experience the outdoors.
     
  9. I`M GOING TO GO AGAINST THE GRAIN HERE, I FEEL THE HUNTER/FIREARMS EDUCATION NEED TO COME FIRST. GRANTED THE CLASS HAS IT`S FLAWS BUT, IT IS AT LEAST SOME BASIC FOUNDATION AND INSTRUCTION TO BUILD ON.

    IN MY SCHOOL SYSTEM HUNTER ED IS TAUGHT TO ALL 7TH GRADE STUDENTS, SO ACCESS TO THE CLASS IS GENERALLY NOT A PROBLEM. ANYONE UNABLE TO ATTEND A CLASS FIRST CAN STILL TAG ALONG WITH AN OLDER HUNTER, THEY JUST CANNOT CARRY A FIREARM OR FIRE A SHOT. THEY STILL GET A TASTE OF THE HUNTING EXPERIENCE THIS WAY, THEY JUST DO NOT GET TO PULL THE TRIGGER.

    OF COURSE YOUNG`UNS CAN STILL PRACTICE SHOOTING(AT TARGETS) WITH OUT A HUNTERS ED CLASS AT ANY TIME, SO I THINK THE CURRENT SYSTEM IS GOOD, NOT PERFECT. BUT I WOULD FEEL MUCH BETTER ABOUT OUR KIDS KNOWING THAT THEY , WITH HUNTERS ED, HAD AT LEAST A BASIC FOUNDATION UNDER THEIR BELTS BEFORE GOING OUT TO KILL ANY ANIMAL.












     
  10. 7th grade h.e. is fine, but these kids will be 12 & 13 by then. What happens if a kid might want to try hunting earlier? Why not let them go with a mentor and then take h.e. in 7th grade or their own.

    H.E. system in its current format is a cake walk. My daughter passed it 94 out of 100 at the age of 7. Granted, she's been around hunting since before she could talk, but still she was among about 15 kids ages 6 to 8 taking the class and they ALL passed and I'm 99% sure that the majority of those other young kids had not spent nearly the time in the woods that my daughter had.

    I really think the mentor thing could be great. Limit to one or two years and then they have no choice but to take H.E. (again hopefully revised) before they can continue to hunt.

    Just my opinions for what they are worth.
     
  11. And with that. H.E. for kids in the 7th grade, while awesome, does not make them qualified, IMO, to be turned loose out into the woods. A mentor is needed regardless. Unfortunately, a few of them will head out to the woods behind the family farm without dad or grandpa ... but hey, they've got an orange H.E. card.:yikes:
     
  12. DEC, I SEE YOUR POINT. AND IT HOLDS SOME VALUE FOR A YOUTH HUNT ONLY.

    HOWEVER ( TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE) A CHILD CAN STILL GO HUNTING WITH AN ADULT ,WITHOUT A H.E. CLASS, THEY JUST CANNOT CARRY A FIREARM OR SHOOT AT AN ANIMAL. THEY CAN STILL GET A TASTE OF THE HUNT WITHOUT THE DANGER OF PLACING A GUN IN THEIR HANDS.

    I JUST FEEL THAT ANY YOUTH THAT IS WILLING TO CARRY A FIREARM AND KILL AN AMIMAL SHOULD HAVE SOME FORMAL HUNTING/FIREARM INSTRUCTION. JUST MY OPINION.
     
  13. Agreed Birch.

    My daughters are light years ahead of other kids when it comes to hunting simply because they have gone hunting with me so many times, in tag along mode (no gun or bow). My oldest is more than competent now to handle a firearm in the field, with my guidance of course. The HE class didn't teach her that. A mentor (me) did.

    I love the formal firearm and hunting training concept, but IMO, the current H.E. system falls way short of being considered "training".
     
  14. cjones & BRICH ..... I do not believe a kid will get any safe gun handling from a class!
    I do believe they need to take the HE class, but gun handling comes w/ handling a gun..... I think the mentor program will do wounders for the hunting community. The mentor I believe needs to have taken the HE class in order to be a mentor. Otherwise it would be almost useless to give a child a gun. You cannot just tell a child what needs to be done they need to be shown!!! I have 2 boys that i started young with, and they still have a laps on occasion, I bet most of us older guys do to. The differance is we know when its done and correct it right away, and if your like me you beat yourself up over it. A child needs to do, not just read and be told, they need good guiedance.

    I think its a great idea!
     
Loading...
Similar Threads Forum Date
Apprentice Hunting Classes Indiana Whitetail Hunting Jan 10, 2010
Apprentice License for turkey hunting... Questions about Indiana Hunting/Fishing Laws Mar 31, 2009